09 April 2009

Where This Is Going

DorothyMay2

Not much to say, just that with the addition of today's impression you can now see where this is all headed. I'm trying not to let this become too Edward Gorey...

WisforWinnie
W is for Winnie embedded in ice. Edward Gorey

9 comments:

Leslie Moore said...

You are so ingenious, Annie! I love these glimpses into your creative process. Thanks!

Oscar Bearinger said...

Annie,
the form of the sinking woman is very well done, lots of movement.
Your sensitivity to (translation of..) history in your work, and in terms of this woman's death is very insightful, and instructive. Thanks.

Your work is a good example of a "cohesive body of work" as discussed on Baren recently.

Wonderful!
Oscar

Andrew Stone said...

Dear Annie,
The falling, sinking girl is a great foil to the ship moving up and to the right. The drowning figure is just right and the ambiguity is maintained and enhanced. The ships sails on and she is left behind forever an enigma.
Not at all E. Gory, your lines and the mood are too different--more Ophelia than Winnie.

Anita Thomhave Simonsen said...

i´m really surprised of this solution...it´s so good....there´s so much movement in the visual connection between the ship and Dorothy falling...great...

Leslie Moore said...

Your new print and Andrew's comment reminds me of the W.H. Auden poem "Musee des Beaux Arts" about Brueghel's painting "The Fall of Icarus": "and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen/Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,/Had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on."

Kim Rosen said...

This is wonderful Annie! The gradient of the water and the silhouette of the sinking girl along with the angle of the boat creates the perfect amount of movement. Well done!

Annie B said...

Thanks so much everyone. You've given me some great images to mull over - Ophelia, Icarus.

Jerry said...

Is it true thet my ,lot of grates, grandmother fell off the Mayflower?

Annie B said...

Jerry! Hi. No, your great to the 13th power grandmother was Priscilla Mullins. No relation to Dorothy Bradford, but when I heard her story I just had to make a print about it!