15 July 2005

Study #2 - "Breathing Buddha"

Here's a second print on the theme of the Kamakura Daibutsu. I used the same palette and style. Here's Block #1, the base layer with highlights ...

Breathing Buddha 1

Each block has a different character depending on how deeply it's cut, how much open space there is, how broad the printing surfaces are. Printing involves constant feedback - checking each print as it comes off the block and making small adjustments to paste, pigment and pressure until it looks right. (Or at least closer to right.) Here's the second block, the darker tones ...

Breathing Buddha 2

And here's the final version, with the darkest tones added ...

Final "Breathing Buddha"

I have to say, I think I've chosen some very unforgiving designs for my first prints. I thought these would be ideal because there are only 3 colors/3 blocks so not too complicated, but I think that the broad printing areas and hard lines are difficult to print. More difficult than a design with lots of cuts and soft edges.

I printed 40 of these.

6 comments:

Cin said...

wonderful ! looking forward to the whole series and curious to see what other parts of the statue you've chosen to focus on. These two especially seem to convey the essence and feel of it.

isay said...

what a learning experience visiting your blog!

tom said...

Hi Annie,

Another strong design.
There are many ways you can use the blocks. If you would like to achieve an even tone you could try printing the same block twice. With Moku Hanga the colours are transparent, so you can build intensity with successive impressions. You may also decide to use different colours on the same block. For instance, the finer detail of the blue block could be printed green, and then the rest of the block printed blue. It is often hard to get a nice dark colour when you overprint, because the paper is already saturated with a pale paste. You can let the print dry or you can carve away these areas from the early blocks.

Alison Ashwell said...

These are very nice- i'd never have guessed you were a novice

nienke said...

What a great technique and your work is beautiful. It radiates peace in some way, thanks!

paige said...

Wow! this is incredible. I will definitely have to spend more time to read through your blog here...I had no idea woodblocks were quite this labor intensive. Tipping my hat of respect to ya! Beautiful designs as well!!